Drawn and Quarterly Your Shopping Cart
Home About Artists Shop Events Press New Blog 211 Bernard Store Blog
Saturday, 22 November 2014

Recap: Kenyon, Plunket & Young


On November 5th we had the pleasure of hosting Deanna Young, Michael Kenyon and Shelagh Plunkett for a night of poetry and writing.


Deanna spoke about her book House Dreams in which she contemplates dreams of houses. She treated us to some insight on the matter from Carl Jung and read some of her haunting poetry.


Michael Kenyon read from his book of poetry, Astatine. It's an elusive radioactive element that he uses as an analog for poetry in this work.


Shelagh Plunkett read from her memoir, The Water Here is Never Blue, a coming of age story set against the backdrop of political turmoil and complicated politics of growing up in Guyana. Thanks to all of our readers for a wonderful, relaxed and intimate evening of writing!

Recap: Lucky Jews by Erica Lehrer!


On October 16th Librairie Drawn and Quarterly hosted a fabulous Canadian launch of Erica Lehrer's fascinating and complex book, Lucky Jews.


Shtetl Montreal host Tamara Kramer introduced the night, and facilitated a conversation with Erica Lehrer. It was an incredibly in-depth conversation, covering Erica's other books (Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places, and Curating Difficult Knowledge: Violent Pasts in Public Places (as co-editor).

 

Tamara and Erica spoke of the heritage industry that’s popped up in Poland, and the debates surrounding the depictions of Jewish culture in the figurines sold in Poland. Erica's process on this topic is incredible; her exploration of the figures (whose quantity in Poland, she says, seems to outnumber actual Jews), and the figures' negative connotations as perpetuating Jewish stereotypes. She pursues these ideas, and researches them to learn more.
 

The event also included the screening of a fantastic film on the subject of Erica's research, which obviously resonated deeply with the audience, whose questions and discussion points afterwards were incredibly interesting. For readers interested in learning more, the video is available here.


Afterwards, the audience was poised with a many questions, regarding how Erica chose the figurines for the exhibit and book, and the tension of people trying to do something good and misfiring. Throughout the conversation it is tremendously engrossing how these figurines embody stereotypes, yet also nostalgia and cultural appropriation.

 

Thanks again to everyone who came out, to Tamara for hosting, and, of course, to Erica! 
Friday, 21 November 2014

As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride

As a child, The Princess Bride was definitely one of my most beloved movies; my poor VHS copy of it was in such heavy rotation that the tape degraded to the point of being nearly unwatchable! Undetterred by such things, I continued to subject everyone in the household to repeated viewings, because it was just necessary. Needless to say, it had a huge impact on me in my formative years, and I'm sure I'm not the only one whose aesthetic was forever influenced by this film.

With that in mind, you can well imagine how excited I am that Westley himself (a.k.a. Cary Elwes, a.k.a. the dreamiest black-clad, ponytailed, moustachioed, dread pirate ever to grace a screen) has penned a book about his experiences working on the film. From Elwes' own backstage anecdotes and memories, to new interviews with his co-stars from their recent 25 year reunion, this book is a veritable fountain of insider info.

The pages featuring candid, behind the scenes photos are positively heart-melting. Just look at Elwes and Wright having a chuckle together on set, or Elwes grappling Andre the Giant (an exercise in futility, clearly!) Show me someone who claims to be unmoved by the overwhelming cuteness of these photos, and I'll show you a liar! Any Princess Bride fan will surely be delighted to get these insights into the making of an iconic film that has truly stood the test of time. 

Tonight: Metatron Phase 2 Launch!

Join us tonight at 7 p.m. for the launch of five new Metatron titles:

   
     A Work No One Told You About, a book of poetry by Olivia Wood
     A Little Death Around the Heart, a book of poetry by Marie Darsigny
     Something Happened To Me, a book of poetry by Julian Flavin
     Human Toilet, a book of poetry by Jason Harvey
     Limes, a novel by Jasper Baydala


Enjoy readings from Olivia Wood, Marie Darsigny and Julian Flavin, with projected videos by Jason Harvey and Jasper Baydala.

Hosted by Ashley Opheim and Guillaume Morissette.
Thursday, 20 November 2014

Tonight! An Evening with the Internet Underground: Double Launch with Gabriella Coleman and Molly Sauter

Join us tonightat 7 p.m. for An Evening with the Internet UndergroundGabriella Coleman and Molly Sauter will both be launching books. How has the internet underground changed politics online and in the world at large? Who is Anonymous? What is a DDoS? Can civil disobedience find a home on the internet? Coleman and Sauter will discuss these questions and more as they read from and talk about their new books, Hacker Hoaxer Whistleblower Spy and The Coming Swarm. There will be a signing and reception after the event.


Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: Half a dozen years ago, anthropologist Gabriella Coleman set out to study the rise of worldwide movement of hackers, pranksters, and activists that operates under the non-name Anonymous just as some of its members were turning to political protest and dangerous disruption (before Anonymous shot to fame as a key player in the battles over WikiLeaks, the Arab Spring, and Occupy Wall Street). She ended up becoming so closely connected to Anonymous that the tricky story of her inside-outside status as Anon confidante, interpreter, and erstwhile mouthpiece forms one of the themes of this witty and entirely engrossing book. The narrative brims with details unearthed from within a notoriously mysterious subculture, whose semi-legendary tricksters – such as Topiary, tflow, Anachaos, and Sabu – emerge as complex, diverse, politically and culturally sophisticated people. Propelled by years of chats and encounters with a multitude of hackers, including imprisoned activist Jeremy Hammond and the double agent who helped put him away, Hector Monsegur, Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy is filled with insights into the meaning of digital activism and little understood facets of culture in the Internet age, including the history of “trolling,” the ethics and metaphysics of hacking, and the origins and manifold meanings of “the lulz.”


In The Coming Swarm, rising star Molly Sauter examines the history, development, theory, and practice of distributed denial of service actions as a tactic of political activism. The internet is a vital arena of communication, self expression, and interpersonal organizing. When there is a message to convey, words to get out, or people to unify, many will turn to the internet as a theater for that activity. As familiar and widely accepted activist tools-petitions, fundraisers, mass letter-writing, call-in campaigns and others-find equivalent practices in the online space, is there also room for the tactics of disruption and civil disobedience that are equally familiar from the realm of street marches, occupations, and sit-ins? With a historically grounded analysis, and a focus on early deployments of activist DDOS as well as modern instances to trace its development over time, The Coming Swarm uses activist DDOS actions as the foundation of a larger analysis of the practice of disruptive civil disobedience on the internet.

Gabriella (Biella) Coleman is the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University. Trained as an anthropologist, teaches, researches, and writes on computer hackers. Her work examines the ethics of online collaboration/institutions as well as the role of the law and digital media in sustaining various forms of political activism. Her first book, Coding Freedom: The Aesthetics and the Ethics of Hacking was published with Princeton University Press. Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy is her second book.

Molly Sauter is a doctoral student at McGill University in Montreal in the department of Art History and Communication Studies. She holds a masters degree in Comparative Media Studies from MIT, and is an affiliate researcher at the Center for Civic Media at the Media Lab and the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.  Her research is situated in socio-political analyses of technology and technological culture, and is broadly focused on hacker culture, transgressive digital activism, and depictions of technology in the media. Her work has been published in The Atlantic, HiLow Brow, io9,The American Behavioral Scientist, and the MIT Technology Review. Her research has been featured by Popular Mechanics, BoingBoing, the BBC, NPR, the CBC, Der Spiegel, and the Christian Science Monitor.  She resides in Montreal, Quebec, and lives on the internet, blogging at oddletters.com and tweeting @oddletters.
Wednesday, 19 November 2014

TONIGHT: A book signing and Q&A with Lauren Wilson, author of The Art of Eating Through the Zombie Apocalypse

Join us on Wednesday, November 19 at 7 p.m. to learn how eat well during the zombie apocalypse! Lauren Wilson will be launching her book, The Art of Eating Through the Zombie Apocalypse. There will be a presentation, a Q&A, and books available for sale and signing!

The Art of Eating Through the Zombie Apocalypse is a cookbook and culinary field guide for the busy zpoc survivor. With more than 75 recipes (from “No Knead To Panic Bread” and “Apocalypse Soup for the Survivor’s Soul” to “Pasta Aglio e Oh No!,” “Down and Out Sauerkraut,” and “Twinkie Trifle”), scads of gastronomic survival tips, and dozens of diagrams and illustrations that help you scavenge, forage, and improvise your way to an artful post-apocalypse meal. The Art of Eating is the ideal handbook for efficient food sourcing and inventive meal preparation in the event of an undead uprising.

Whether you decide to hole up in your own home or bug out into the wilderness, whether you prefer to scavenge the dregs of society or try your hand at apocalyptic agriculture, and regardless of your level of skill or preparation, The Art of Eating will help you navigate the wasteland and make the most of what you eat.

Just because the undead’s taste buds are atrophying doesn’t mean yours have to!

About the author:

Lauren Wilson was infected with a rare strain of undead enthusiasm over a decade ago while fighting off the zombie menace of Raccoon City in the original Resident Evil. From video games to comic books, zombie walks to online communities, there are few corners of the culture she has not explored. And she’s got a decent zed t-shirt collection, to boot. When not nerding out about zombies, space, or Adventure Time, Lauren works in the world of food as a professional cook and writer. Since completing her culinary training at Toronto’s George Brown Chef School in 2008 she has done a variety of work—from restaurant cooking to cheesemongering, online sales to catering, teaching cooking classes to writing for print and online media. She completed research and course development work at George Brown examining the career motivations, ambitions, and expectations of students with the aim of better understanding low female representation at the executive level of professional kitchens. After eating up all the good bits of Toronto, Lauren followed a trail of crumbs to Brooklyn, where she is cooking, eating, writing, and teaching happily.

JUST IN: Lucky Peach - The Holiday Issue!


Lucky Peach, the finest in food journals, issue 13 "FEEL THE JOY!" hit newsstands yesterday and you can pick it up here at D&Q today. Just in time - I don't care if it's early! - with the snow arrived I'm ready to give in and get into the holiday spirit. 


This issue is packed with flavor as it travels from Eid in Afghanistan to the food mountains of Indonesia and back for the holidays in Haiti. On the menu Jim Meehan serves a cup of cheer with his holiday cocktails, cooking for Christmas in India and a ton of baking. Plus: Lisa Hanawalt's holiday food diary, blueprints for a gingerbread drug mansion, fiction from Anthony Bourdain and a special Christmas comic from Michael DeForge!

Build your own minature Gunungan, food mountain
The fuzz will raid your gingerbread drug mansion
Lisa Hanawalt's holiday diary tells all
Christmas cooking in India
One family feasts on Fergus Salad
A ton of baking with Dorie Greenspan
More baking!
Christmas Dinner by Michael DeForge
Between mouthwatering recipes and risqué food pin-ups the Holiday Issue will boost your morale as the cold sets in and you'll feel the joy in no time!
Tuesday, 18 November 2014

This just in: Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia

Behold the dizzying world of celebrated artist and cofounder of DEVO, Mark Mothersbaugh! Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia, edited by Adam Lerner with an foreward by Wes Anderson, is the most comprehensive collection of his vast work to date.

Mothersbaugh is known for working in a vast array of media, including photography, drawing, sculpture, screenprinting, and even rugs!

Not-at-all-creepy photography!
Rug art!
Some of Mothersbaugh's Roli Polis sculptures
DEVO!
Monday, 17 November 2014

Limonov: The Outrageous Adventures of the Radical Soviet Poet Who Became a Bum in New York, a Sensation in France, and a Political Antihero in Russia

Emmanuel Carrère's fascinating book about the equally fascinating Eduard Limonov has been translated into English from the original French!

Limonov: The Outrageous Adventures of the Radical Soviet Poet Who Became a Bum in New York, a Sensation in France, and a Political Antihero in Russia is a semi-fictionalized portrait, or "pseudobiography" of the enigmatic Ukrainian Eduard Limonov. Despite its rather picaresque title, it is actually a dark tale, covering the violence and political upheaval of the second half of the twentieth century. 

It has garnered heaps of praise since its publication. The New Yorker calls it "maddening, electrifying", Publishers Weekly calls it "astute, witty", and the New York Times calls it a "picaresque gonzo biography" with a "crackling translation by John Lambert." Doesn't hurt either that Gary Shteyngart calls Emmanuel Carrère "France's greatest writer"!

Check out José Teodoro's review in the National Post, Matt Taibbi's review over at NPR, or Michael Dirda's review for the Washington Post for more details. Or just come get it for yourself!

Sunday, 16 November 2014

Recap: Ladies Night

October 30th was Ladies Night here at D&Q. Hosted by Metatron - Guillaume Morissette introduced the writers. It was the last stop on a road tour across North America for these four ladies of the USA. In the spirit of Hallowe'en they were dressed up as a motley crew of superheroes - can you guess who is who?

1.








2.
3.
4.
5.
1.Guillaume Morissette 2.Elizabeth Ellen 3.Chloe Caldwell 
4.Chelsea Martin 5.Mira Gonzalez

Everyone gave great readings and the house was packed! Thanks to all who came out and made it a fantastic night.

Emma Waltraud Howes : Ankyloglossia (n. tongue-tie) book launch

Join us on Friday, December 5 at 7 p.m. for the Montreal launch of Emma Waltraud HowesAnkyloglossia! Jacob Wren, Caroline Boileau, and Emma Waltraud Howes will read excerpts from the book. There will be a Q&A with the audience, and catalogues for sale! 


About the book:

Ankyloglossia (n. Tongue-tie) is a volume of parts, carefully composed through compiled notes, diagrams, and scores that act as an extension for a new installation work of the same title by Canadian artist Emma Waltraud Howes. The artist book’s layout and dramaturgy are inspired by three seminal performance works—Yvonne Rainer’s choreography The Mind is a Muscle (1968) and Samuel Beckett’s pieces Not I (1972) as well as Quad (1981). 


Exploring perspectives towards gesture and non-semantic language, Howes questions the ethics of choreography in search of a new means of expression. A variety of textual contributions produced by the artist herself and a series of invited collaborators—B, Patricia Reed, Gregor Runge, Lorenzo Sandoval, Anna-Sophie Springer, and Maxwell Stephens—reference, explore, and appropriate connections to and between these historic works. Brought together in this way as an ensemble, these artists and writers appear in the interludes, the intermission, and in scattered scenes, pronouncing their participation in what is an evolving theater.

Concept and Design by Emma Waltraud Howes and Franziska Morlok

With contributions by B, Emma Waltraud Howes, Patricia Reed, Gregor Runge, Lorenzo Sandoval, Anna-Sophie Springer, and Maxwell Stephens

Photography: Kai Wido Meyer


The artist's book is published on the occasion of the premier of Ankyloglossia (n. Tongue-tie) by Emma Waltraud Howes presented as a solo exhibition within the International Studio Programme at Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin between 9 October – 2 November 2014.

Emma Waltraud Howes is the 2013/14 grantee of the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec and the Ministère des Relations internationales du Québec.

With the kind support of the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec and the Ministère des Relations internationales du Québec

120 pages
Colour and Black & White Images
ISBN: 978-3-941230-35-4
Co-published by K. Verlag and Künstlerhaus Bethanien GmbH


Emma Waltraud Howes is influenced by the 'Theatre of the Absurd’. Guided by observations on contemporary gestures, her projects manifest as choreographed reconfigurations of the body informed by a background in dance and the visual arts. She frames these elements towards a reconciliation of mind-body dualisms through performance and interdisciplinary installations.

Guest reader Caroline Boileau is pursuing a reflection on the body and health through a practice combining performance, drawing, video and installation. She delves into the various ways in which one can inhabit, depict and talk about the body.

Since 1995, she has participated in residencies in Canada and in Europe. Her work has been presented in exhibitions in Canada, USA, Belgium, Spain, Austria, Finland and Brazil. She holds an MFA from Concordia University. Her work in drawing is represented by Espace Robert Poulin in Montréal and she is a member of the Regroupement des arts interdisciplinaires du Québec (RAIQ).


Guest reader Jacob Wren makes literature, performances and exhibitions. His books include: Unrehearsed Beauty (Coach House Books, 1998), Families Are Formed Through Copulation (Pedlar Press, 2007), Revenge Fantasies of the Politically Dispossessed (Pedlar Press, 2010) and Polyamorous Love Song (Book Thug, 2014), a finalist for the 2013 Fence Modern Prize in Prose. As co-artistic director of Montreal-based interdisciplinary group PME-ART he has co-created the performances: En français comme en anglais, it's easy to criticize, Individualism Was A Mistake, The DJ Who Gave Too Much Information and Every Song I’ve Ever Written. He travels internationally with alarming frequency and frequently writes about contemporary art. 

Join the Facebook event here
Saturday, 15 November 2014

Windows on the World: 50 Writers, 50 Views

We just received this beautiful new book! The contents of Matteo Pericoli's Windows on the World: 50 Writers, 50 Views might be familiar to readers of the Paris Review's blog, where he has had an ongoing writers and their windows series for several years. Now they are collected in this pretty volume.

Artist and architect Matteo Pericoli draws the window views of writers living all over the world. Each of his exquisite, detailed drawings is accompanied by an essay from the writer, describing what they see through their window, and reflecting on their connection to the outside world is as they write.

The endpapers provide a map with each writer's location conveniently pinpointed!

Here are some of the store's favourite writers and their windows:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie writes about her window view in Lagos, Nigeria: "...it is a view choked with stories because it is full of people."

Karl Ove Knausgård writes about his window view in Glemmingebro, Sweden: "...something happens in repetition: sooner or later the heap of sameness, accumulated through all the identical days, starts to glide.... The view from my window is a reminder of this slow and invisible process."

Sheila Heti writes about her window view in Toronto and the elderly man framed in it every day: "He stares at his shrub while I stare at my computer.... Our bodies are opposite each other every day, and we stare at things, and wait for the emptiness to fill in."

Alejandro Zambra writes about his window view in Santiago, Chile: "I'm not sure that this little studio is the best place in the house to write. It's too hot in summer and too cold in winter. But I like this window."

This could be a pretty excellent holiday gift book...!

Blog Archive

HOME BACK Your Shopping Cart
ABOUT D+Q
ARTISTS
SHOP
EVENTS
PRESS
NEW
Newsletter
SIGN UP FOR UPDATES






This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?


copyright 2010 drawn & quarterly