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Tuesday, 8 September 2015

Signal, Coach House and Palimpsest Fall Poetry Launch!



Join us on Saturday, October 17th at 7:00 p.m. for a quadruple launch with Coach House and Palimpsest authors David Solway, Derek Webster, Mary Dalton, and Joshua Trotter! See below for info about the authors and books:

Installations, David Solway’s 14th book of poetry, is haunted with transformation, Few poets possess as commanding a gift for metaphor or can use it to masterfully conjure the ever-changing landscape of the natural world. Like the jerry-rigged farmer’s contraption that stands in for “eclectic grandeur and jumbled eloquence,” this collection celebrates the way ordinary elements can be yoked to create wholly original insights. Be it through rhyme or free verse, slang or lyricism, and roaming a dazzling range of tones—satirical, philosophical, scabrous, tender, celebratory—Installations offers up a world depicted and inhabited in all its manifestations.





David Solway is the author of many award winning books of poetry and prose including Director’s Cut (2003), his critique of contemporary poetry; Franklin’s Passage (2003), winner of Le Grand Prix du Livre de MontrĂ©al; and Reaching for Clear (2006), awarded the A.M. Klein Prize for Poetry. He lives in Gananoque, Ontario.











 In poetry that strikes a delicate balance between candour and lament, Mockingbird tracks the aftershocks of a failed marriage through a variety of self-portraits. Derek Webster’s speakers itemize their regrets and fears while keeping sentimentality in check, the result is a first book of exceptional emotional power. Indeed, the distinctive and nuanced shapes of Webster’s exquisitely controlled lyrics highlight the great achievement of his debut: a clipped, often aphoristic line-making stripped down to cold truths. The struggle isn’t about being yourself, these poems argue, but about deciding which version of yourself to accept—and surviving the decision with equanimity. “Your small life wants to live in you / despite everyone’s attempts to do it in.”

Born in Richmond, Virginia, Derek Webster grew up in Beijing, Toronto and London. He received an MFA in Poetry from Washington University in St. Louis, where he studied with Carl Phillips, Erin Belieu and Yusef Komunyakaa. His poetry and prose have appeared in The Fiddlehead, The Malahat Review, The Walrus, and Boston Review. The founding editor of Maisonneuve magazine, he lives in Montreal.




Edge collects thirty years of essays, reviews, and interviews by celebrated Newfoundland poet Mary Dalton. Driven by a need to reconfigure how the margin is seen in literature, culture and politics, Dalton explores the work of writers and artists who occupy an imaginative threshold or edge: from the dark visions of Samuel Beckett to the dialogue novels of I. Compton-Burnett, from the apocalyptic Boatman paintings of fellow artist Gerald Squires to the vernacular poetry of John Steffler. Showcasing a use of language as vivid, precise, and supple as that in Dalton's award-winning poetry, Edge reflects the range of a major Canadian poet's interests and influences and celebrates what she calls "people being grounded in their place, people knowing where they were, who they were, having a sense of connection to the land."



Mary Dalton has published five volumes of poetry, including Merrybegot (2003) and Red Ledger (2006), and Hooking (2014). Her work has been widely anthologized in Canada and abroad. Dalton has won numerous awards, including the E.J. Pratt Award (the Newfoundland and Labrador Book Award), and has been shortlisted for the Winterset, Pat Lowther, Atlantic Poetry Award, the inaugural J. M. Abraham Award, and the inaugural Fred Cogswell Award for Excellence in Poetry. She lives in St. John's, Newfoundland.









Mission Creep began as reworkings of the CIA's Human Resources Exploitation Training Manual. Attempts to torture the text itself -- obeying literary constraints, employing audio editing tools, and displacing it with other voices, including Hannah Arendt's and Evel Knievel's -- reveal convoluted narratives, transmissions that contemplate whether torture provides useful information. At once a fugue and an absurdist comedy, info-overload and pure tone, Mission Creep comes on with the fire of apocalyptic prophecy and melts on the tongue like the last snowflake of winter.






Joshua Trotter lives in Montréal. His work has been anthologized in Jailbreaks: 99 Canadian Sonnets and The Best Canadian Poetry in English. His first book, All This Could Be Yours, was selected by the National Post as one of the top 10 poetry books of 2010.

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