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Thursday, 28 April 2016

TONIGHT at 7pm: Bookthug Spring Launch with Joni Murphy, Malcolm Sutton, Stephen Thomas and Jacob Wren!

Sure, we launch lots and lots and lots of crazy good books, it's kind of our thing, and every once in awhile a real gangbuster of an event comes along that gets us all giddy...and this is one of those.

One of favourite publishing houses, Book Thug, is unveiling a four killer books from a quadrumvirate of authors you need to watch (and read)!



Malcolm Sutton's JOB SHADOWING:

 An unemployed man, losing his ability to imagine a future self, disappears into the shadow world of an ambitious millennial. His wife, an idealistic artist at the turning point of her career, falls deeper and deeper into the gravitational field of her ultra-wealthy employer.

 Job Shadowing is a novel of our 20th-century desires torn asunder by the new millennium. Through stylish, searching prose, it tests the grounds of impossible love, generational identity and middle-class fantasy.

A smooth art thriller in the tradition of BolaƱo, Job Shadowing meddles with corporate culture, dying domesticity and the living, breathing life of the alienated worker. Malcolm Sutton’s work is stimulating and stand-alone. —Tamara Faith Berger, author of Maidenhead


Joni Murphy's DOUBLE TEENAGE:

This unrelenting novel shines a spotlight on paradoxes of Western culture. It asks impossible questions about the media’s obsession with sexual violence as it twins with a social unwillingness to look at real pain. It asks what it feels like to be a girl, simultaneously a being and a thing, feeling in a marketplace. Wherever they are—whether in a dance club in El Paso or an art lecture in Vancouver—these characters brush against maddening contradiction and concealed brutality.

Double Teenage seems like the definitive book of The Young Girl as defined by Tiqqun. It’s also a definitive book about NAFTA, the Ciudad Juarez femicides, spectacular serial killings, and media’s comforting lull. — Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick.

Jacob Wren's RICH AND POOR:

Rich and Poor is a novel of a man who washes dishes for a living and decides to kill a billionaire as a political act. It is literature as political theory and theory as pure literary pleasure—a spiraling, fast-paced parable of joyous, overly self-aware, mischievous class warfare.

 As his plan proceeds and becomes more feasible, the story cuts back and forth between his and the billionaire’s perspectives, gradually revealing how easily the poisons of ambition, wealth and revolutionary violence can become entangled. A fable of not knowing how to change the world and perhaps learning how to do so in the process.

Wren’s ability to speak about the abstruse and unusual, hidden in all that is profane in our social comings and goings, forms the basis of the novel’s magnificent and defining concept, one that does not seek to be a testimony, but rather, to be rapturous metaphor. —Sergio Chejfecm, author of The Planets.

Stephen Thomas's THE JOKES:

Like a series of moments in a social media–like ‘feed,’ this collection of very short stories riffs on the form of ‘the joke,’ but as this might be understood by the best culture-critical comedians of our time: Andy Kaufman, Stephen Wright, Jon Stewart, Richard Pryor. Much like those stand-up artists who sanctified the joke-form, these stories deal with intense subjects, yet with a kind of SSRI-like placidity that allows readers to cling to each word as the narratives unfold.

Sad and funny, hopeful and ecstatic, nostalgic and cerebral, the vignettes in The Jokes offer a very personal, yet amazingly relatable entry-point into some of the big ideas that trouble our times—gender identity, sexuality, life and death, and ways of being in the world.

The Jokes, feels to me like an absent-minded Lydia Davis trying to write deadpan comedy skits for Cartoon Network’s Tim & Eric. It’s anti-humour that’s actually funny, sketches in which nothing is ever resolved, mini-stories that start at Point A and then seem to forget what they were even talking about. This is a book full of surprises. —Guillaume Morissette, author of New Tab.

Please, for your own sake, don't miss this. Words will be exchanged and refreshments will be served. See you then, loyal reader!




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