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Friday, 1 April 2016

This Shelf Belongs to...Guillaume Morissette!

Each month, Librairie Drawn and Quarterly invites a local author or artist to curate a shelf in the store. This April, we bring you recommendations from Guillaume Morissette!

One of our favourite Montreal authors, Guillaume's latest novel New Tab (VĂ©hicule Press, 2014) was a finalist for the 2015 Amazon.ca First Novel Award, and is, of course, featured on his shelf. He also serves as the co-editor of Metatron, an independent publisher based in Montreal, and his work has appeared in Maisonneuve Magazine, Little Brother Magazine, Vice, Electric Literature, The Quietus and many other publications.

In addition, all of Guillaume's picks will be 15% off for the month of April! Here's a sneak peak of what you'll find on his shelf:

NO LONGER HUMAN by Osamu Dazai (1948)
"A semi-autobiographical novel, No Longer Human is considered a 'classic' in Japan, more or less the cultural equivalent of The Sun Also Rises by Hemingway for us. As a writer, Dazai can be eccentric, lucid, profoundly alienated, self-destructive, funny, memorable. I would also recommend, I think, just reading Japanese novels in translation in general, things like Almost Transparent Blue by Ryu Murakami and Snakes & Earrings by Hitomi Kanehara."

"Leaving The Atocha Station feels like a contemporary classic to me. Set in Spain, the novel follows a poet on a fellowship who suspects himself to be a fraud and views himself as inadequate for being unable to have 'a profound experience of art.' I feel like I’d love to go play bowling or something with Ben Lerner, seems like that would be really cute and fun."

DAYS OF ABANDONMENT by Elena Ferrante (2002)
"A novel about an Italian housewife in her early 40's whose life is suddenly ravaged when her husband decides one morning, out of the blue, to leave her. I would describe this book as a “downward spiral,” though it’s also weirdly compelling and frequently beautiful at the sentence level."

THE EASTER PARADE by Richard Yates (1976)
"I particularly like the scenes in this book in which two characters are yelling extremely true things at one another for a few pages."

TEEN SURF GOTH by Oscar D'Artois (2015)
"This book was published by Metatron, the small press I co-edit in Montreal. It’s labeled as a 'poetry collection,' but it feels more to me like if an internet meme and a poetry book had a baby and then abandoned that baby in the computer section at Best Buy. With poem titles like 'Sexy Tumblr,' 'Disco medusa' or 'Teach me how to love what doesn’t look the other way,' D’Artois definitely doesn’t come across as overly serious, but his poems also betray a kind of all-encompassing sincerity that feels, to me, relatable and effective. More poetry books should be like this, by which I mean fun and spirited."

LONG RED HAIR by Meags Fitzgerald (2015)
"Meags is a ridiculously talented illustrator and storyteller who lives in Montreal. I recommend following her on Instagram."

BIG KIDS by Michael Deforge (2016)
"I generally like authors who are funny on Twitter, it’s a good rule of thumb when looking for new things to read."

SO SAD TODAY by Melissa Broder (2016)
"Happy Valentine’s Day from the abyss. A wonderful, relatable, funny collection of essays by Melissa Broder, a poet who runs the popular @sosadtoday Twitter account. I love her."

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